Adventures in fume hoods

I’m still occupied with other activities (like unpacking boxes, and discovering just how many bugs I can inadvertently cram into 100 lines of perl), but in the absence of blogging I invite you to enjoy the latest PhD Comics strip on fume hoods.
This rings especially true since my lab in grad school needed a fume hood only occasionally, and therefore had only one which sat mostly neglected in the fabrication lab. This made it a fantastic storage closet for unknown chemicals until somebody actually needed to use it for science, at which point hazmat teams would need to be called. (Note to Berkeley EH&S: joking!)
In contrast, the most hazardous chemical at my new job is the curry from Teriyaki Boy, a.k.a. “The Yak”. (Angelenos: Picture the Japanese-food equivalent to Tommy’s chili.)

5 thoughts on “Adventures in fume hoods

  1. Mason

    Oh dear…
    I ought to make a version of this comic strip about the random stuff one can find lying around the Oxford Colleges—such as the firecrackers in the drawer my friend and I once found and a book from the 19th century which covered the random shit this guy saw while walking along the street (purveyors of various things, an amusing incident with a bum, etc.) One could apparently publish anything in those days…
    By the way, when I read “bugs” I inadvertently thought about the living kind. That’s probably because there was a conversation at dinner tonight about the enormous number of rats in the walls at a 14th century cottage a friend of someone at dinner recently bought. (Note: I actually refrained from bringing up Lovecraft, though I probably shouldn’t have.)

  2. Lemming

    Heh. The “two chemicals that should never be this close to each other” reminds me of a certain cardboard box of jugs and jars that was under my sink for a while…

  3. Kaleberg

    My favorite story involves a laboratory which worked on molds and fungi. According to Science, they built a proper laboratory to confine all the noxious biologicals, and the offices were all isolated. All went well except one poor bastard (a term not used in the article) was afflicted with horrible allergic reactions. Everyone was sympathetic. They got him an office air cleaner. He took antihistamines.
    Then, someone actually figured out where all the air circulating from their containment facility was going. Somehow, everything was venting through his office in duct. No one was sure how they managed this screw up, and it was fixed ASAP, but that comic brought this tale to mind.

  4. Kaleberg

    My favorite story involves a laboratory which worked on molds and fungi. According to Science, they built a proper laboratory to confine all the noxious biologicals, and the offices were all isolated. All went well except one poor bastard (a term not used in the article) was afflicted with horrible allergic reactions. Everyone was sympathetic. They got him an office air cleaner. He took antihistamines.
    Then, someone actually figured out where all the air circulating from their containment facility was going. Somehow, everything was venting through his office in duct. No one was sure how they managed this screw up, and it was fixed ASAP, but that comic brought this tale to mind.

  5. Kaleberg

    My favorite story involves a laboratory which worked on molds and fungi. According to Science, they built a proper laboratory to confine all the noxious biologicals, and the offices were all isolated. All went well except one poor bastard (a term not used in the article) was afflicted with horrible allergic reactions. Everyone was sympathetic. They got him an office air cleaner. He took antihistamines.
    Then, someone actually figured out where all the air circulating from their containment facility was going. Somehow, everything was venting through his office in duct. No one was sure how they managed this screw up, and it was fixed ASAP, but that comic brought this tale to mind.

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